ICE RESISTANCE | CAMPAIGN TO UNITE COLORADO

909v8B5OJUAo9p65HlLNtzdV_3Z4fJ6Xi9WHQ_N1NTk

TO REPORT RECENT ICE ACTIVITY OR POLICE/ICE COLLABORATION, CALL OUR HOTLINE 844-864-8341.

CAMPAIGN TO UNITE COLORADO ¡TU VOZ ES EL PODER!

Stopping deportations and building trust, dignity, and equal protection under the constitution!

LOGO1-1The Campaign to Unite Colorado works to end extremely harmful collaborations between local law enforcement and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), though passing local and state level policies that promote safety & trust.

Tu Voz es el Poder, Colorado Te Escucha is a project to document ICE activities and police/ICE collaborations, monitor patterns that guide our legislative efforts and build a strong statewide network of people resisting deportations in their own communities. The testimonies of directly impacted people helped Colorado repeal our own “show me your papers law” that forced local police to act as ICE agents in 2013.

 

NATIONAL BACKGROUND

On November 20th, 2014, President Obama reinforced the U.S. government’s dragnet deportation system by launching the Priority Enforcement Program. Also known as “PEP Comm,” the program shares the fingerprints of everyone booked in jail with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). PEP Comm asks local law enforcement to notify ICE when suspected immigrants are released from jail. This strategy brings local sheriffs and police into federal immigration enforcement and is the primary mechanism for funneling our communities into the deportation system. The recent executive action by President Trump on January 25th 2017 seeks to drastically expand ICE enforcement, incentivize and force local police to play the role of immigration officers, as well as reinstate deportation programs that the Obama Administration had created and then repealed/reduced due to constitutional violations and devastating impacts on communities. How this executive order will be implemented remains to be seen.

COLORADO BACKGROUND

The Colorado Immigrant Rights Coalition and the ACLU of Colorado worked with Colorado sheriffs to reject ICE detainer holds – a request ICE makes to local jails to maintain people under arrest beyond their time of release when suspected of being undocumented. Based on recent U.S. District Court cases in Oregon and Chicago, federal judges have ruled that ICE detainers are administrative requests, and do not meet standards of judicial review (as opposed to arrest warrants), which violate 4th Amendment protections.

In April of 2014, the ACLU of Colorado wrote to every sheriff in the state explaining that the additional detention amounts to a new arrest, which Colorado sheriffs lack the authority under Colorado law to make. Several sheriffs responded within days to the ACLU letter by announcing that they would no longer honor the holds. Over the next few months, CIRC and the ACLU coordinated with individual sheriffs to draft detainer policies that reaffirmed the need for a judicially approved warrant to hold an inmate past their release date. As of 2015, Colorado became the first state in the nation where every county has officially rejected the use of unconstitutional ICE detainer requests.

IMPACT ACT (2017)

In order to codify these local victories into state law, we have worked the County Sheriffs of Colorado to draft the IMPACT (Improving and Maintaining Protections, Accountability, and Community Trust) Act. During the 2017 Colorado legislative session, CIRC will be moving the legislation forward, working with key allies in the state capitol to protect immigrant communities. By passing IMPACT, the we would win the following protections:

  • NO ICE HOLDS WITHOUT JUDICIAL WARRANTS

IMPACT would prohibit local jails from holding people for Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) unless they have a judicially approved criminal warrant. ICE detainer requests, administrative warrants, and requests for notification will not be accepted as valid for delaying or denying the lawful release of an individual. If ICE can’t provide a criminal warrant, jails cannot hold people past their release date or after they post bond.

  • NO DENIAL OR DISCOURAGEMENT OF BOND FOR ICE HOLDS

People who have been awarded bond or bail by a judge shall not be discouraged or denied the payment of their bond due to the presence of ICE detainer requests, administrative warrant, or requests for notification.

Please contact Kyle Huelsman if you have questions or comments concerning the IMPACT Act (303-328-5638, kyle@coloradoimmigrant.org).

DOCUMENTING ICE ACTIVITIES – CALL CIRC’S ICE INCIDENT HOTLINE TO REPORT RECENT ICE ACTIVITY 844-864-8341

TO REPORT RECENT ICE ACTIVITY OR POLICE/ICE COLLABORATION, PLEASE CALL OUR HOTLINE 844-864-8341. Leave a message with your name, city/town where you live, phone number, and brief summary of the story. Someone will be in touch with you within 5 business days. WE ARE NOT ATTORNEYS AND CANNOT PROVIDE LEGAL ADVICE.

TU VOZ ES EL PODER, COLORADO TE ESCUCHA (Your Voice is Power, Colorado is Listening) is a project to collect stories of recent police/ICE collaborations and ICE activities in order to monitor what ICE is doing, see how new policies are impacting communities & their trust in the police, and gather evidence to support long term policy changes that further limit collaboration between local law enforcement and ICE.

CIRC’s ICE incident hotline – 844-864-8341 – is coordinated by a statewide network of volunteers trained to document testimonies of ICE/police interactions and to support individuals to navigate and fight their own deportation cases. If you would like to become a documenter, please contact Sophia Clark at sophia@coloradoimmigrant.org.

Find us on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tuvozeselpoder

Know Your Rights!

CIRC has an interactive curriculum to teach communities about their rights when confronted with ICE or police in the state of Colorado. The trainings include: What is the difference between ICE and different police forces; brief overview of current deportation practices; ICE showing up at court; ICE/police conducting a home raid; police traffic stop; paying bond at the jail; and getting your loved one released from jail if there is an ICE hold request.

If you are interested in a Know Your Rights training for your community, or in becoming a trainer, please contact Sophia Clark at sophia@coloradoimmigrant.org.